When hobos came to the southside neighborhood

Back when I was a young boy growing up in our Southside neighborhood, we had a lot of men who would ring our back doorbell asking if they could have something to eat. The Great Depression and World War II made for a hard time for many people. So from 1929 until around 1946 there […]

Posted on June 6th, 2008 by Ken Harrison in History

Hillbilly music had a home in the Tree Streets

There were a lot of “start up” businesses in America at the end of WWII. One of our neighbors, Jim “Hobe” Stanton, who lived in the 400 block of West Pine Street, decided to start his Rich-R-Tone Record Company in 1946. His first records were the 78-speed records. As he progressed through the years, he […]

Posted on June 6th, 2008 by Ken Harrison in History

The Southside Neighborhood General Mills

In our research and interviewing, we are constantly discovering new and fascinating stories about the people who have lived and are currently living in our Southside Neighborhood.  We are also fortunate to have many of these people sharing artifacts with us and giving us “leads” to even more and more impressive folk who have been […]

Posted on June 6th, 2008 by Ken Harrison in History

Television comes to the Tree Streets

Walter Brownlow, who lived with his wife and children at 821 West Pine Street, was known for years as “Brownlow the Radio Man”. His radio shop at 411 West Walnut Street was a mainstay for the latest model radios and record players. He also repaired them when they burned out a tube or otherwise failed. […]

Posted on June 6th, 2008 by Ken Harrison in History